WNC Book ReviewEdition

‘Sight’ Is A Penetrating Vision Of Motherhood, Science And More

Sight, by Jessie Greengrass Jessie Greengrass’ novel is packed with shimmering sentences and poetic paragraphs from a narrator who’s never content to drift along, but must probe “the convoluted crenellations of the mind.” (Image credit: ) ...

‘Coyote Doggirl’ Is A Childlike Western With Hidden Depths

Coyote Doggirl, by Lisa Hanawalt Artist Lisa Hanawalt creates kids’ stories for grownups, both on TV — she’s the production designer for BoJack Horseman — and in her new book Coyote Doggirl, a candy-colored Western saga. (Image credit: ) ...

Titles and Troubles: American Heiresses Abroad

“The Husband Hunters” is Anne de Courcy’s glittering account of the Gilded Age wave of young women whose fortunes saved the British aristocracy. ...

Mad, Bad and Difficult to Know: The Life of a Rebel Aristocrat

In “Ninety-Nine Glimpses of Princess Margaret,” Craig Brown dishes out gossipy tales of Queen Elizabeth’s younger sister. ...

Bill Cunningham, Style Maven, Leaves Behind a Memoir and It’s ‘a Real Dilly’

In his posthumous book, “Fashion Climbing,” the Times’s onetime fashion and society photographer recalls his younger days as a hat maker and man about town. ...

Witty, Imaginative, Risky And Relentless — ‘Flights’ Soars

Olga Tokarczuk’s book won the 2018 Man Booker International Prize. Critic John Powers says the hard-to-classify work is positively exploding with maps, remembrances, riffs, history and more. ...

Meet the ‘Change Agents’ Who Are Enabling Inequality

In “Winners Take All,” Anand Giridharadas explores a global elite that bemoans the state of the world while refusing to seek real, structural change. ...

Once ‘Ball Lightning’ Gets Rolling, This Sci-Fi Mind-Bender Shines

Ball Lightning, by Cixin Liu The novel is Chinese writer Cixin Liu’s first in English since his “Remembrance of Earth’s Past” trilogy. And that series’ radical creativity returns in this tale of scientific striving — eventually. (Image credit: ) ...

In ‘Severance,’ The World Ends Not With A Bang, But A Memo

Severance, by Ling Ma Ling Ma’s shocking and ferocious new novel mashes up a zombie apocalypse story with the everyday tribulations of office life — you may run from zombies but you’ll never escape middle management. (Image credit: Samantha Clark/NPR) ...

3 Sweet Reads For August’s Hot Days

The Long Way Around, by Quinn Anderson We’re sweating toward the end of summer, and that calls for a romance binge. This month, we’ve got some suspense, a road trip — destination love — and a gritty look at Regency England. (Image credit: ) ...

A Young Woman Claims Her Power In ‘Open Me’

Open Me, by Lisa Locascio Lisa Locascio’s novel follows 18-year-old Roxana, whose summer abroad in Denmark becomes both a political and sexual awakening when she falls for the Danish student charged with helping her settle in. (Image credit: Samantha Clark/NPR) ...

Charming, Plucky Picture Books That Ease Back-to-Class Jitters

The very best kids’ books — like these — help the under-10 set work through their fears. ...

A Graphic Tribute to a Classic Work of Paleontological Literature

The children’s book author and illustrator David Nytra draws a review of William E. Scheele’s “Prehistoric Animals.” ...

What Role Do Teachers Play in Education?

Andrea Gabor’s “After the Education Wars” looks at efforts to reform the classroom through technology and standardized testing. ...

A Writer’s Trip Into the Amazon Reveals Brazil and Himself

Chris Feliciano Arnold’s “The Third Bank of the River” is a reported and personal look at the problems plaguing the Amazon and its people. ...

Searching for Language to Capture How Climate Change Has Altered Our World

In “Rising,” Elizabeth Rush surveys the new contours of an America already changed by rising waters. ...

Stepsisters, Lovers and Gender-Bending Artists, Now Celebrated in a Novel

In “Never Anyone but You,” Rupert Thomson reimagines the lives of the Surrealist icons Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore. ...

An American in Japan, Leading a Zen Koan of a Life

Tracy Franz’s “My Year of Dirt and Water” considers the paradoxical experience of being married to a Buddhist monk, cloistered in a Japanese temple. ...

A Critic Who Worships Literature, and Defends His Faith Accordingly

In his passionate new essay collection, “American Audacity,” William Giraldi fiercely emphasizes the cultural importance of high literary standards. ...

Expressing Complicated Love for Lauryn Hill as an Iconic Album Turns 20

In “She Begat This: 20 Years of ‘The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill,’” Joan Morgan makes a case for Hill’s artistic and historical importance while also paying attention to the stickier parts of the star’s career. ...