WNC Book ReviewEdition

Solving a Reign of Terror Against Native Americans

In “Killers of the Flower Moon,” David Grann uncovers a shattering history of oil greed, racism and serial murder targeting the Osage Indians. ...

A Battering of Chances Against the Cosmic Wheel

In his new collection, “Living in the Weather of the World,” Richard Bausch proves yet again that he’s a master of the short story. ...

Are the New Megadonors Distorting American Society?

David Callahan’s “The Givers” examines a new wave of philanthropists: how they operate, what makes them tick. ...

A Life in 40 Questions: Harrowing Stories of Child Migration

In “Tell Me How It Ends,” Valeria Luiselli describes her encounters with undocumented migrant children and the circumstances that produced them. ...

Finding Sobriety in the Rural Rituals of Her Remote Orkney Home

In “The Outrun,” Amy Liptrot recalls her decade as a London party girl, followed by the spectacular solitude of Scotland. ...

A Collection of Tales Large and Small Finds Humor Among the Ruins

The down-and-out moments in Deb Unferth’s story collection, “Wait Till You See Me Dance,” manage to be both witty and emotional intimate. ...

Two Immigrant Families Intertwine During London’s Summer of Bombs

Margot Singer’s novel “Underground Fugue” follows the intermingled fortunes of four Londoners in the summer of the terrorist bombings. ...

Simone de Beauvoir Imagined Contemporary Womanhood in the 1960s

Five decades ago, Simone de Beauvoir wrote “Les Belles Images.” The 1967 novel explains modern womanhood in a nutshell. ...

‘The Radium Girls’ Is Haunted By Glowing Ghosts

The Radium Girls, by Kate Moore Kate Moore’s account of the sufferings and struggles of the Radium Girls — factory workers who were poisoned by the glowing radium paint they worked with — reads like a true crime narrative. (Image credit: Marian Carrasquero/NPR) ...

In ‘Walkaway,’ A Blueprint For A New, Weird (But Better) World

Walkaway by Cory Doctorow Cory Doctorow’s latest novel is set in a ripped-from-the-headlines near future dystopia, where the creative and the capable — and the lost — are walking into the wilderness to build a new world. (Image credit: ) ...

Life with a Rare Genetic Disease: The Science, the Suffering and the Hope

Two new books — “Mercies in Disguise” by Gina Kolata and “The Family Gene” by Joselin Linder — look at how individuals cope with devastating genetic diseases. ...

Elizabeth Strout’s Lovely New Novel Is a Requiem for Small-Town Pain

In “Anything Is Possible,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “Olive Kitteridge” writes with a frank, unapologetic emphasis on forbidden desire. ...

‘Maud’ Doesn’t Quite Live Up To Its Heroine’s Example

Maud by Melanie Fishbane Lucy Maud Montgomery — creator of Anne of Green Gables — seems like the perfect subject for a work of young adult fiction. But Melanie Fishbane’s Maud feels like a draft of a Montgomery story. (Image credit: ) ...

The Man to Blame for Our Culture of Fame

His name was Walter Winchell, and he presided over Table 50 of the Stork Club, temple of a new cult of celebrity, in mid-20th-century Manhattan. ...

An Artist Fears She’s a Fraud in ‘A Line Made by Walking’

Sara Baume’s second novel follows a 25-year-old Irishwoman (one who cries all day) down the rabbit hole of elegiac distress. ...

Gripping Comics Memoir ‘Hostage’ Puts You In The Room Where Nothing Happens

Cartoonist Guy Delisle departs from the first-person travelogue format which has won him acclaim to chronicle the true story of a man kidnapped and detained for months in the Caucasus region in 1997. (Image credit: Drawn and Quarterly) ...

‘Anything Is Possible’ Is Unafraid To Be Gentle

Anything is Possible Elizabeth Strout’s new novel-in-stories is a welcome salve for troubled times. A companion volume to last year’s My Name is Lucy Barton, Anything is Possible looks at the people Lucy grew up with. (Image credit: Marian Carrasquero/NPR) ...

A Brilliant, Incendiary Joan of Arc Story for a Ravaged Earth

In Lidia Yuknavitch’s novel “The Book of Joan,” a space colony of survivors orbits a post-apocalyptic Earth. ...

The Truth Is Out There, and the Feds Paid to Find It

In “Phenomena,” Annie Jacobsen explores the government’s research into things that go bump in the night. ...

Paula Hawkins’s ‘Into the Water’ Dives Into Murky Skulduggery

This new novel by the author of the 2015 monster hit “The Girl on the Train” features many ways for women to die in a rural British town. ...