WNC Book ReviewEdition

Turning the Lens Around on Richard Avedon

In “Avedon: Something Personal,” by Norma Stevens and Steven M. L. Aronson, friends and colleagues remember the fashion photographer who revolutionized his field. ...

Maureen Corrigan Picks Books To Close Out A Chaotic 2017

Fresh Air‘s book critic says her 2017 list is chaotic in a good way. “These books zing off in all directions: They’re fresh, unruly and dismissive of the canned and contrived.” (Image credit: Laura Roman/NPR) ...

Are the American West’s Wildfires Inevitable?

Michael Kodas’s “Megafire” and Edward Struzik’s “Firestorm” analyse the misguided history and dire results of America’s wildfire management policy. ...

For December, Forget Wrapping Presents And Treat Yourself To These 3 Romances

Escape from the holiday whirl with three tasty romances, featuring a duke with an epic library, a young girl finding herself in the big city and a proper lady finding love where she least expects it. (Image credit: ) ...

Lives Other Than His Own

In Jenny Erpenbeck’s timely novel, a retired classics professor finds his routine existence transformed when he befriends a group of African refugees. ...

Making Citizens’ Lives Better

David Goldfield’s “The Gifted Generation” explains the importance of government. ...

Adding Up a Prolific Poet’s Charming Weather Reports

“The Complete Poems of A. R. Ammons” showcases, in two very large volumes, the friendly and searching style of a writer who twice won the National Book Award. ...

The Hand of the Comic Artist

Manohla Dargis reviews two new books that examine the aesthetics and the business of comics, from Superman to R. Crumb. ...

The Comic Strip’s Heyday in ‘Cartoon County’

Cullen Murphy recounts his coming-of-age among the elites of American illustration. ...

A Polite Drive for Secession in ‘Radio Free Vermont’

The well-known environmentalist Bill McKibben turns his hand to satire in this novel about an old-school radio host who falls backward into the revolution business. ...

The Last Civic Remnant of Authentic Spirituality at Christmastime

Jonathan Keates’s “Messiah: The Composition and Afterlife of Handel’s Masterpiece” seeks to save the oratorio from centuries of misinterpretatin. ...

Franklin Roosevelt’s Story Is Worth Telling Again and Again

Robert Dallek’s “Franklin D. Roosevelt” examines both the public and the private man. ...

‘I Am the Kind of Woman I Would Run From’

The journalist heroine of Anthony Quinn’s novel “Freya” is both headstrong and ambitious. Neither will be assets in post-World War II Britain. ...

From Working for Jesse Helms to Writing ‘Tales of the City’

In “Logical Family,” Armistead Maupin describes a conservative upbringing before he became a beloved author and L.G.B.T. activist. ...

Great Art, Repugnant Politics

“Growing Up With the Impressionists,” the childhood diary of Julie Manet, daughter of Berthe Morisot and Eugene Manet, reveals some unsavory views. ...

Anti-Fascism With a Human Face

In “A Bold and Dangerous Family,” Caroline Moorehead continues her Resistance Quartet with the story of Amelia, Carlo and Nello Rosselli. ...

Reading ‘Catcher in the Rye’ Today

An illustrated review of J. D. Salinger’s classic from a 21st-century perspective. ...

The Future Is Now, and Dark, in T. Coraghessan Boyle’s Stories

The characters in Boyle’s new collection, “The Relive Box,” battle modern problems badly. ...

She Breaks Rules While Expecting Students to Follow Them

In “The Education of Eva Moskowitz,” the controversial founder of Success Academy Charter Schools sets out to defend her pedagogical approach and settle scores. ...

Yearning for an Earlier Era of American Diplomacy

Jeffrey A. Engel’s “When the World Seemed New” recounts the last spasm of Republican internationalism. ...